When you have made a mistake that has compromised your employment in Washington and left you facing a serious criminal conviction, you may be feeling anything but optimistic about your future. However, after you have taken responsibility for your actions and are cleared to continue living your life, you may have a much better chance of finding employment if you approach this process the right way.

To begin, your focus should be on the content of your resume. Focus on your competencies and the things that you do well. Highlight the reasons why you would make an excellent employee and how your involvement would provide valuable resources to anyone who chooses to hire you. In the work history portion of your resume, be forthright about addressing any gaps in your work history if you were required to spend time behind bars.

The Herald-Tribune, suggests that in an interview setting, you answer questions related to your conviction with honesty. Address what happened and take full responsibility for the mistakes that you made. You may also consider discussing how your conviction and ultimately the consequences you paid, helped mold you into the person you are today. Choose to turn your focus toward smaller companies who often have much more lenient rules for hiring people who have previously been convicted of crime. Utilizing resources such as a professional job counselor can also be helpful in your quest to find a job.

The information in this article is intended for educational purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice.